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dc.contributor.authorNelson, David
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-19T13:09:51Z
dc.date.available2015-10-19T13:09:51Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/54101
dc.descriptionPresented on October 12, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. in the Howey Physics Building, Lecture Hall 2.en_US
dc.descriptionDavid R. Nelson is a Professor of Physics and Applied Physics and Arthur K. Solomon Professor of Biophysics at Harvard University.
dc.descriptionRuntime: 63:05 minutes
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding deformations of macroscopic thin plates and shells has a long and rich history, culminating with the Foeppl-von Karman equations in 1904. These highly nonlinear equations are characterized by a dimensionless coupling constant (the "Foeppl-von Karman number") that can easily reach vK = 10^7 in an ordinary sheet of writing paper. Since the late 1980's, it has been clear that thermal fluctuations in microscopically thin elastic membranes fundamentally alter the long wavelength physics, leading to a negative thermal expansion coefficient, and a strongly scale-dependent bending energy and Young's modulus. Recent experiments from the McEuen group at Cornell that twist and bend individual atomically-thin free-standing graphene sheets (with vK = 10^13!) call for a theory of the mechanical deformation of thermally excited membranes with large Foeppl-von Karman number. We present here results for the bending and pulling of thermalized graphene ribbons and in the cantilever mode.en_US
dc.format.extent00:00 minutes
dc.format.extent63:05 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectStatistical mechanicsen_US
dc.titleThe Statistical Mechanics of Graphene Membranes and Ribbonsen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Physicsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameHarvard Universityen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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