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dc.contributor.advisorChoi, Young Mi
dc.contributor.authorWu, Xiaolong
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-07T17:22:18Z
dc.date.available2016-01-07T17:22:18Z
dc.date.created2014-12
dc.date.issued2014-12-05
dc.date.submittedDecember 2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/54312
dc.description.abstractWith the development of technology, people's viewpoints of the automobile have shifted; instead of merely a means of transportation, the automobile has become a space in which a driver can still perform daily activities besides driving, such as communicating with other people, interacting with electronic devices, and receiving information. In the meantime, different ways of interaction have been explored. Among all the modalities, gestures have been considered as a feasible way for performing in-car secondary tasks because of their intuitiveness. However, few researches have been conducted in terms of subjects' cognitive load. This thesis has examined four gesture interfaces (air swipe, air tap, screen swipe, and screen tap), in terms of their effects on drivers' driving performance, secondary task performance, perceived cognitive load, and eye glance behavior. The result demonstrated that air gestures are generally slower than screen gestures with regard to secondary performance. Screen swipe gesture requires the lowest cognitive load while air swipe and screen tap gesture remain the same. Subjects in this study tend to prefer screen swipe gesture the most while prefer air tap gesture the least. However, there is no significant difference between air swipe and screen tap gesture. Although air tap gesture and screen tap gesture generated the largest amount of dwell times, no variance among the four gesture interfaces in driving performance has been found. The result indicated that even though air gestures are not limited by space, screen swipe in this study still seemed to be the most ideal way for performing in-car secondary task of music selection.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technology
dc.subjectGesture interaction
dc.subjectVehicle
dc.subjectSecondary task
dc.subjectCognitive workload
dc.titleA comparative study about cognitive load of air gestures and screen gestures for performing in-car music selection task
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeM.S.
dc.contributor.departmentIndustrial Design
thesis.degree.levelMasters
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWalker, Bruce N.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPurdy, Tim
dc.date.updated2016-01-07T17:22:18Z


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