Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorElliot, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-07T15:48:45Z
dc.date.available2016-03-07T15:48:45Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-25
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/54561
dc.descriptionPresented on February 25, 2016 from 11:00 am to 12:00 noon in the Georgia Tech Architecture Libraryen_US
dc.descriptionMichael Elliott is the associate director of Georgia Institute of Technology’s Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development (CQGRD) and an associate professor, jointly appointed to the Schools of City and Regional Planning and Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research focuses on environmental dispute dynamics, evaluating the effectiveness of dispute management processes and systems, and examining the social impact of collaborative processes, with emphasis on risk perception, conflict assessment, political analysis, and strategies for managing conflict in complex, multi-party disputes associated with public policymaking.
dc.descriptionRuntime: 57:35 minutes
dc.description.abstractChattanooga, Tennessee is considered to be amongst the most sustainable cities in the United States. Kent Portney’s research (Taking Sustainability Seriously) places the city in the top ten most seriously engaged in promoting sustainability. At the same time, Chattanooga is well known for its use of civic engagement and partnership-based economic development tools, often called the “Chattanooga Way,” to revitalize its downtown and waterfront. These two factors are not unrelated, as social capital and civic engagement are often cited as necessary ingredients of successful sustainability efforts. Research to date, however, has not explored this relationship effectively. Previous research linking civic capacity to sustainability has largely focused on the environmental aspects of sustainability. Of equal concern are the economic and equity aspects. In this light, sustainability in the city and region cannot depend solely on the concentrated redevelopment of the urban core, which constituted the initial focus of Chattanooga’s sustainability efforts. More recently, the City of Chattanooga has actively sought to expand the focus of its sustainability efforts both into the neighborhoods within the city and across the region. This presentation explores the link between civic engagement and sustainability, with a particular emphasis on the impact of civic engagement on moving cities beyond traditional sustainability goals (that emphasize environmental-economic values) to more holistic goals (that integrate equity concerns explicitly into the environmental-economic-equity balance). This work hypothesizes that capacity of cities to engage more holistic goals emerges out of the civic capacity developed from earlier efforts to promote civic engagement in sustainability efforts. The presentation explores the processes by which this growth in civic engagement occurs, its interaction with sustainability efforts, and the longer term implications for maintaining the social capital needed to promote sustainability.en_US
dc.format.extent57:35 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCollege of Architecture Research Forumen_US
dc.subjectCivic engagementen_US
dc.subjectLocal governanceen_US
dc.subjectSustainabilityen_US
dc.titleSustaining Sustainable Cities: Building Grassroot and Elite Support for Long-Term Urbanismen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of City and Regional Planningen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Public Policy
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record