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dc.contributor.authorBirnbaum, Molly
dc.contributor.authorCoupland, John
dc.contributor.authorSouza, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-23T13:33:35Z
dc.date.available2016-06-23T13:33:35Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/55306
dc.descriptionPresented on May 7, 2016 at 10:00 am in the Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons, room 152.en_US
dc.descriptionMolly Birnbaum is Executive Editor of Cook’s Science at America’s Test Kitchen. An alum of Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism, Molly is also author of the memoir "Season to Taste: How I Lost My Sense of Smell and Found My Way," a personal inquiry into the science and psychology of the sense of smell, published by Ecco/HarperCollins and shortlisted for an IACP award in Literary Food Writing in 2011.
dc.descriptionJohn Coupland is a professor of food science at Penn State and President-elect of IFT, the professional society for food scientists. He is a native of the UK where he earned his BS and PhD in food science from Leeds University. His research program is concerned with the physical chemistry of lipids, particularly emulsions. Recently his group has studied the ways food structure can bind flavors and antioxidants and change their performance.
dc.descriptionDan Souza is Executive Test Cook of Cook’s Science at America’s Test Kitchen. He is a cast member of the Emmy-Award Winning television show "America’s Test Kitchen" and a weekly contributor to "America’s Test Kitchen Radio." After graduating first in his class from the Culinary Institute of America, Dan cooked in restaurants Boston and New York before finding his true calling: applying good science to create great recipes for the home cook.
dc.descriptionRuntime: 94.38 minute
dc.description.abstractThis year, the Squishy Physics Saturday will focus on the exciting science of “Ice-cream”. Almost everyone loves the silky smooth taste of chocolate melting on their tongue. You might be surprised that a great deal of science is required to produce your favorite ice cream with just the right texture, flavor and appearance. Why would having an ice cream be challenging in the Alpes, at high altitude? Can I say that ice cream is a solid? If so, what is the difference with ice? Is it a simple material or is it made of different substances? What is the role in everything there is in ice cream? Together, we will explore this and other questions related to the exciting and entertaining intersection between science and ice cream. Awards will also be presented to the top middle and high school student submissions for the Squishy Physics photography contest. This contest is organized in conjunction with the Fernbank Science Center.en_US
dc.format.extent94.38 minute
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSquishy Physicsen_US
dc.subjectFlavoren_US
dc.subjectIce creamen_US
dc.subjectScienceen_US
dc.subjectTextureen_US
dc.titleIce-Creamen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Physicsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenamePennsylvania State University. College of Agricultural Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameAmerica’s Test Kitchenen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameProfessional Society for Food Scientistsen_US
dc.embargo.termsnullen_US


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