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dc.contributor.authorChristin, Nicolas
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-02T14:43:37Z
dc.date.available2016-09-02T14:43:37Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/55715
dc.descriptionPresented on August 26, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. in the Klaus Computing Building, Room 1116W.en_US
dc.descriptionNicolas Christin is an Associate Research Professor in the School of Computer Science and in Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. He is affiliated with the Institute for Software Research, and is a core faculty member of CyLab, the university-wide security institute. His research interests are in computer and information systems networks; most of his work is at the boundary of systems and policy research, with a slant toward security aspects. He has most recently focused on online crime, security economics, and psychological aspects of computer security.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 55:26 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractIn this talk, I will argue that understanding incentives of both attackers and targets has become critical to strengthening online security. I will advocate the need for an interdisciplinary research agenda, ranging from network measurements and large-scale data analysis to human factor modeling. Using case studies (online sale of unlicensed pharmaceutical drugs, and anonymous marketplaces), I will first describe how longitudinal, large-scale measurements and data analysis reveal important economic and structural properties of a priori complex criminal ecosystems. I will then discuss how these structural properties can be used to design successful interventions, both from a policy and from a technical angle. On the policy side, I will show that our criminal ecosystem analysis evidences "concentration points," whose disruption could effectively hamper illicit operations. On the technical side, I will demonstrate how we can use adversaries' incentives to design and build systems that can proactively identify future attack targets. I will conclude by outlining a roadmap for security research combining measurements, mathematical modeling and behavioral aspects.en_US
dc.format.extent55:26 minutes
dc.format.mimetypehttps://mediaspace.gatech.edu/media/christin/1_8qxpqhl2
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCybersecurity Lecture Seriesen_US
dc.subjectHuman factoren_US
dc.subjectMeasurementsen_US
dc.subjectSecurityen_US
dc.titleSecurity Analytics: Bridging large-scale data collection and analysis with human factors to design better defensesen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Information Security & Privacyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameCarnegie-Mellon Universityen_US


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