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dc.contributor.authorSober, Samuel
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-27T18:08:18Z
dc.date.available2016-09-27T18:08:18Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/55891
dc.descriptionPresented on September 12, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. in the Georgia Tech Student Center Ballroom.en_US
dc.descriptionDr. Sam Sober is an Assistant Professor at Emory University, Department of Biology. Dr. Sober completed his PhD in 2005 at the University of California, San Francisco. In 2010 he joined the Biology faculty at Emory University. Dr. Saber's research combines advanced experimental and computational techniques to investigate how the brain performs complex tasks and learns from experience.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 64:09 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractThe brain uses sensory feedback to calibrate the performance of complex behaviors. However, the neural and computational bases of sensorimotor learning remain mysterious. Our lab uses behavioral, physiological, biomechanical, and computational techniques to investigate the biological underpinnings vocal learning in songbirds. My talk will cover three ongoing lines of investigation into how songbirds correct vocal errors and precisely coordinate the acoustics of vocal production. First, our behavioral studies demonstrate that songbirds use vocal variability to constrain the speed and extent of vocal learning, and that the dynamics of learning across a number of experimental conditions can be understood as the result of an iterative process of Bayesian inference. Second, recent neuroanatomical and lesion studies demonstrate a crucial role for dopaminergic inputs to a basal ganglia nucleus in mediating vocal reinforcement learning. Third, neurophysiological recordings and computational analyses suggest that cortical motor neurons employ a millisecond-resolution spike timing code to regulate vocal behavior. Recent single-unit recordings from muscle tissue in behaving animals and in vitro measures of vocal biomechanics further suggest that millisecond-scale spike timing is an essential component of motor control, suggesting that reorganization of fine temporal spiking patterns might underlie vocal plasticity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectBiomedical engineeringen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen_US
dc.titleVocal Motor Control and Sensorimotor Learning: Behavior, Physiology, and Biomechanicsen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Neural Engineering Centeren_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameEmory University. Department of Biologyen_US


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