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dc.contributor.authorKohl, Paul A
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-11T13:32:21Z
dc.date.available2016-10-11T13:32:21Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/55911
dc.descriptionPresented on September 16, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. in the Marcus Nanotechnology Building, room 1116.en_US
dc.descriptionPaul Kohl received a Ph.D. from The University of Texas, in Chemistry in 1978. After graduation, Dr. Kohl was employed at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, NJ from 1978 to 1989. During that time, he was involved in new chemical processes for silicon and compound semiconductor devices and their packaging. In 1989, he joined the faculty of the Georgia Institute of Technology in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, where he is currently a Regents' Professor and holder of the Hercules Inc./Thomas L. Gossage Chair. Dr. Kohl's research interests include new materials and processes for advanced interconnects for integrated circuits, and electrochemical energy devices for energy conversion and storage.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 59.09 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractDielectric materials (i.e. insulators) provide critical functions throughout the packaging hierarchy, including on-chip dielectrics, package substrates, and printed wiring boards. Transient polymers, those which vaporize on command, can be used to form ultra low-k dielectrics, such as porous materials or air-cavities. Transient polymers can also be used as coatings or structural materials in electronic packages and devices enabling the disappearance of the device when the collection, recovery or disposal of the device is difficult. In this presentation, the nature of transient polymers will be described including their synthesis, and physical properties. Transient polymers can be decomposed to the liquid or gaseous state when exposed to thermal, chemical or photo-chemical stimulus. The response time and type of stimulus will be described. Finally, several applications for transient polymers in the fabrication of unique devices, structures or packages will be described.en_US
dc.format.extent59.09 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNano@Tech Lecture Seriesen_US
dc.subjectNanotechnologyen_US
dc.subjectMaterialsen_US
dc.subjectPackagingen_US
dc.subjectPolymersen_US
dc.titleTransient Polymers for Low-k Dielectrics and Decomposing Electronic Devicesen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnologyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineeringen_US


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