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dc.contributor.authorKrakauer, John
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-20T15:18:38Z
dc.date.available2017-03-20T15:18:38Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/56529
dc.descriptionPresented on March 6, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. in the Engineered Biosystems Building.en_US
dc.descriptionDr. John Krakauer is a Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience, and Director of the Center for the Study of Motor Learning and Brain Repair at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Krakauer's clinical interest is stroke, including ischemic cerebrovascular disease, subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage, arteriovenous malformation, cerebral vasculitis, cerebral aneurysm, and venous and sinus thrombosis.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 64:36 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractThere are critical differences in the potential for rehabilitation of impairment early and late after stroke. Early after stroke the proportional recovery rule for spontaneous biological recovery applies, as does the idea of a sensitive period. Late after stroke, rehabilitation relies on motor learning principles. We will need new behavioral treatments augmented by pharmacology and perhaps non-invasive brain stimulation to rectify the overall ineffectiveness of current neurorehabilitationen_US
dc.format.extent64:36 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGT Neuro Seminar Seriesen_US
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectStrokeen_US
dc.titleRethinking Recovery and Rehabilitation after Strokeen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Neural Engineering Centeren_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameJohns Hopkins University. School of Medicineen_US


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