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dc.contributor.authorOckman, Joan
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-12T19:40:45Z
dc.date.available2017-05-12T19:40:45Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/58088
dc.descriptionPresented on March 31, 2017 at the 2017 Spring Symposium on Architecture, Phantasmagoria, and the Culture of Contemporary Capitalism in the Architecture Library, Architecture West Building, College of Design at Georgia Tech.en_US
dc.descriptionSession Oneen_US
dc.descriptionJoan Ockman is Distinguished Senior Lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design and Visiting Professor at Cooper Union School of Architecture. An architecture educator, historian, writer, and editor, she has edited Architecture Culture 1943-1968, The Pragmatist Imagination, and Out of Ground Zero. She is currently completing a collection of essays titled Architecture Among Other Things, to be published next year by Actar.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 26:29 minutes
dc.description.abstractOnce upon a time, in the days when modern architecture was young, circulation through a building was primarily a functional problem. By the mid-twentieth century, when the monument building morphed into the spectacle-building, the circulation system began to take on aesthetic implications of its own and to become a central feature of a building’s architectural identity. Think of Wright’s Guggenheim Museum or Saarinen’s TWA Terminal. Of course, Baroque architects already appreciated the expressive potential of dynamic scenography four centuries ago. But today the mania for circulation spaces manifest in cutting-edge architecture goes well beyond formal virtuosity. Escalators, ramps, elevators, stairs, bridges, catwalks—these privileged elements of contemporary buildings not only belong to a form-making culture that at all costs (figuratively and literally) wishes to avoid the appearance of fixity, but emanate from the very structure of the neocapitalist imaginary. In this talk we attempt an allegorical reading of architecture’s “culture of circulation.” What are the implications of an architecture that is about circulation?en_US
dc.format.extent26:29 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesArchitecture, Phantasmagoria, and the Culture of Contemporary Capitalism Symposiumen_US
dc.subjectArchitectureen_US
dc.subjectCirculationen_US
dc.titleCulture of Circulationen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Designen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Pennsylvaniaen_US


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