Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSaha, Barna
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-31T17:25:09Z
dc.date.available2017-10-31T17:25:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/58857
dc.descriptionPresented on October 23, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. in the Klaus Advanced Computing Building, Room 1116E.en_US
dc.descriptionBarna Saha received her Ph.D. from the University of Maryland College Park, and then spent a couple of years at the AT&T Shannon Labs as a senior researcher before joining UMass Amherst in 2014. Her research interests are in theoretical computer science specifically in algorithm design and analysis, and large scale data analytics.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 56:58 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractThe language edit distance is a significant generalization of two basic problems in computer science: parsing and string edit distance computation. Given any context free grammar, it computes the minimum number of insertions, deletions and substitutions required to convert a given input string into a valid member of the language. In 1972, Aho and Peterson gave a dynamic programming algorithm that solves this problem in time cubic in the string length. Despite its vast number of applications, in forty years there has been no improvement over this running time. Computing (min,+)-product of two n by n matrices in truly subcubic time is an outstanding open question, as it is equivalent to the famous All-Pairs-Shortest-Paths problem. Even when matrices have entries bounded in [1,n], obtaining a truly subcubic (min,+)-product algorithm will be a major breakthrough in computer science. In this presentation, I will explore the connection between these two problems which led us to develop the first truly subcubic algorithms for the following problems with improvements coming for each of these problems after several decades: (1) language edit distance, (2) RNA-folding-a basic computational biology problem and a special case of language edit distance computation, (3) stochastic grammar parsing—fundamental to natural language processing, and (4) (min,+)-product of integer matrices with entries bounded in n^(3-ω-c) where c >0 is any constant and, ω is the exponent of the fast matrix multiplication, believed to be 2.en_US
dc.format.extent56:58 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesARC Colloquiumen_US
dc.subjectApproximation algorithmsen_US
dc.subjectFine-grained complexityen_US
dc.subjectMatrix multiplicationen_US
dc.titleLanguage Edit Distance, (min,+)-Matrix Multiplication and Beyonden_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Algorithms, Randomness and Complexity Centeren_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Massachusetts at Amherst. College of Information and Computer Sciencesen_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • ARC Talks and Events [68]
    Distinguished lectures, colloquia, seminars and speakers of interest to the ARC community

Show simple item record