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dc.contributor.authorJhaver, Shagun
dc.contributor.authorVora, Pranil
dc.contributor.authorBruckman, Amy
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-12T20:41:17Z
dc.date.available2017-12-12T20:41:17Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/59080
dc.description.abstractResearch has shown that people all over the world, and particularly Americans, are divided over many issues – from immigration and gun control to economic and foreign policy. Information bubbles further contribute to these divisions: People prefer to consume content they feel familiar with and see views they agree with. Yet, pluralism and viewpoint diversity are necessary for a well-functioning democracy. In this paper, we explore how we can design interfaces that dial down partisan antipathy and allow users with opposing viewpoints to understand one another. We study ChangeMyView (CMV) subreddit, a community that encourages users to change their opinion by inviting reasoned counterarguments from other members. We use interviews with 15 CMV members to gain insights about the design mechanisms and social norms that allow this community to function well. We also explore how we can replicate such civil interactions between users with different ideologies on other platforms.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGVU Technical Report ; GIT-GVU-en_US
dc.subjectArgumentationen_US
dc.subjectChangeMyViewen_US
dc.subjectGamificationen_US
dc.subjectPolitical discourseen_US
dc.subjectRedditen_US
dc.titleDesigning for Civil Conversations: Lessons Learned from ChangeMyViewen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. GVU Centeren_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Interactive Computingen_US


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