Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBras, Bert
dc.contributor.authorKono, Jamie E.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-22T21:05:34Z
dc.date.available2018-01-22T21:05:34Z
dc.date.created2016-12
dc.date.issued2016-12-09
dc.date.submittedDecember 2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/59168
dc.description.abstractResidential consumers have a large potential for utility peak demand reduction. As more homeowners acquire solar generation capacity and electric vehicles, the variable demand on the grid becomes more concerning while the potential for localized load smoothing grows. This thesis models possible outcomes of a small residential microgrid implemented to observe utility-driven demand response events and to provide local power services during outage scenarios. An hourly reduced-order building model and mobile and stationary battery model are used to create a 10-home microgrid which incorporates photovoltaic (PV) arrays, electric vehicle (EV) discharge to grid, stationary batteries, and house setbacks as strategies to reduce peak consumption and provide energy services during outages.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technology
dc.subjectMicrogrid
dc.subjectDemand response
dc.subjectEnergy
dc.subjectSolar
dc.subjectSmartgrid
dc.subjectElectric vehicles
dc.subjectV2G
dc.subjectVehicle to grid
dc.titleConsumer savings and peak reduction potential of a simulated residential microgrid with demand response and electric vehicle discharge capabilities
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeM.S.
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering
thesis.degree.levelMasters
dc.contributor.committeeMemberAugenbroe, Godfried
dc.contributor.committeeMemberTelenko, Cassandra
dc.date.updated2018-01-22T21:05:34Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record