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dc.contributor.advisorSulchek, Todd
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Kathryn Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-22T21:09:29Z
dc.date.available2018-01-22T21:09:29Z
dc.date.created2017-12
dc.date.issued2017-08-28
dc.date.submittedDecember 2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/59213
dc.description.abstractMultifunctional particles have been of great interest in a variety of fields including electronics, biology, chemistry, and medicine due to their ability to have multiple functionalities, both biological and non-biological, in a single entity. In therapeutic design, they have the potential to simultaneously target a specific site, monitor delivery as well as carry multiple drugs. Despite the many advances in multifunctional particles, there are still few methodologies that can spatially control multiple chemical and biological ligands on a single particle. In this thesis, a novel method has been explored to fabricate multi-sided particles using repeated glancing angle metal evaporation on microparticles and nanoparticles. We further showed that this method can enable spatial segregation of proteins on individual particles. Through this investigation, the order of functionalization and thickness of metal evaporation layer were found to be important variables in achieving spatial segregation of the functionalized protein. Additionally, these particles can be imbued with other non-biological and unique functionalities based on choice of metal, such as magnetic and antimicrobial properties, which have been preliminarily explored. Overall, this work demonstrates a novel methodology for the creation of a spatially patterned particles which can be made to be multifunctional and reconfigurable, for a variety of potential applications.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technology
dc.subjectMultifunctional particles
dc.subjectE-beam evaporation
dc.subjectCerberus particles
dc.subjectJanus particles
dc.subjectFabrication
dc.titleFabrication and characterization of multifunctional particles with spatially segregated proteins
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeM.S.
dc.contributor.departmentBiomedical Engineering (Joint GT/Emory Department)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKane, Ravi
dc.contributor.committeeMemberChampion, Julie
dc.date.updated2018-01-22T21:09:29Z


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