Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorShell, Dylan
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-08T18:12:30Z
dc.date.available2018-03-08T18:12:30Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/59405
dc.descriptionPresented on February 14, 2018 from 12:15 p.m.-1:15 p.m. in the Marcus Nanotechnology Building, Rooms 1116-1118, Georgia Tech.en_US
dc.descriptionDylan Shell is an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University. His research focuses on systems that exploit their physical embedding to interact with the world, working to understand, design, and build such systems. He has published papers on multi-robot task allocation, biologically inspired multiple-robot systems, estimation of group-level swarm properties, minimalist- and multi-robot manipulation, rigid-body simulation and contact models, human-robot interaction, and robotic theatre. The National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and DARPA have funded Shell’s work. He has been the recipient of an NSF Career award, the Montague Teaching award, the George Bekey Service award, and multiple best reviewer awards.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 61:46 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractIn late July last year, it came to light that iRobot Corp. intended to sell the maps that modern Roomba vacuum cleaning robots build to help them navigate. This caused a public furor among consumers. This situation and several others (e.g., nuclear inspection, use of untrusted cloud computing infrastructure) suggest that we might be interested in limiting what information a robot might divulge. How should we think about robotic privacy? In this talk I’ll describe a line of research that is concerned with this question, starting by showing that cryptography doesn’t solve the problem. I’ll begin by examining a privacy-preserving tracking task, then look at how one might think about estimators that are constrained to ensure they never know too much. Finally, I’ll talk about planning subject to information disclosure constraints and introduce a useful structure that we call a “plan closure.”en_US
dc.format.extent61:46 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIRIM Seminar Seriesen_US
dc.subjectCryptographyen_US
dc.subjectRoboticsen_US
dc.subjectRobotics privacyen_US
dc.subjectRobotsen_US
dc.titleRobots with Privacy Stipulationsen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machinesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameTexas A & M Universityen_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • IRIM Seminar Series [93]
    Each semester a core seminar series is announced featuring guest speakers from around the world and from varying backgrounds in robotics.

Show simple item record