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dc.contributor.authorTakayama, Shuichi
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-20T20:28:52Z
dc.date.available2018-03-20T20:28:52Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/59429
dc.descriptionPresented on March 13, 2018 at 12:00 p.m. in the Marcus Nanotechnology Building, Room 1117, Georgia Tech.en_US
dc.descriptionProf. Shuichi Takayama’s research interests (B.S. & M.S. from the University of Tokyo, Ph.D. from the Scripps Research Institute) started with organic synthesis of enzyme inhibitors. Subsequently he pursued postdoctoral studies in bioengineered microsystems at Harvard University as a Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Fellow with goal of developing microsystems to perform bioevaluations of the inhibitor molecules he synthesized. He spent 17 years at the University of Michigan in the Biomedical Engineering Department and Macromolecular Science and Engineering Program then moved to the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory School of Medicine in the summer of 2017. He is an associate editor of Integrative Biology and on the board of several other journals. Awards and honors include the NSF CAREER award, Pioneers of Miniaturization Prize, and AIMBE Fellow.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 53:45 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractThis presentation will give an overview of efforts in our laboratory to develop microfluidic systems to control cell microenvironments and to perform high precision biochemical measurements. Microfluidic technologies to be discussed include computer-controlled microfluidics, self-switching microfluidic transistor-like circuitry, microfluidics that utilize aqueous two phase droplets, and fracture fabrication of tunable nanochannels. Specific biomedical applications that will be discussed include lung-on-a-chip, microfluidic assisted reproductive technologies and in vitro fertilization, heartbeat-on-a-chip, chromatin analysis in fracture-fabricated nanochannels, and protein biomarker analysis. The long-term goal is to create miniature patients-on-a-chip for understanding disease mechanisms, testing drugs, performing better cell-based therapies, and validating protein biomarkers.en_US
dc.format.extent53:45 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNano@Tech Lecture Seriesen_US
dc.subjectMicrofluidicsen_US
dc.subjectNanotechnologyen_US
dc.subjectPatients-on-a-chipen_US
dc.titleMicrofluidic Circuits and Biomedical Applicationsen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnologyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Dept. of Biomedical Engineeringen_US


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