Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMarks, Tobin
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-13T18:06:50Z
dc.date.available2018-04-13T18:06:50Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/59537
dc.descriptionPresented on March 29, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. in the Engineered Biosystems Building (EBB), Seminar Room, Georgia Tech.en_US
dc.descriptionTobin Marks is Ipatieff Professor of Catalytic Chemistry, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor of Applied Physics, and Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Northwestern University. He obtained a BS degree in Chemistry from the University of Maryland, and a PhD in Inorganic Chemistry from MIT. His recognitions include the U.S. National Medal of Science, the Spanish Principe de Asturias Prize, the Materials Research Society Von Hippel Award, the Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences Award in Chemical Sciences, the American Chemical Society Joseph Priestley Medal, and the Israel Harvey Prize. He is a member of the U.S., German, and Indian National Academies of Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the U.S. National Academy of Inventors. He is a Fellow of the U.K. Royal Society of Chemistry, the Materials Research Society, and the American Chemical Society. Marks has published 1260 peer-reviewed articles and holds 265 issued U.S. patents. He holds Honorary Doctorate Degrees from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the University of South Carolina, the Ohio State University, and the Technical University of Munich.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 68:32 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractThis lecture focuses on the challenging design, realization, understanding, and implementation of new materials families for unconventional electronics. Fabrication methodologies to achieve these goals include high-throughput, large-area, high-resolution printing techniques. Materials design topics will include: 1. Rationally designed high-mobility p- and n-type organic semiconductors for printed organic CMOS, 2. Self-assembled high-k nanodielectrics enabling ultra-large capacitance, low leakage, high breakdown fields, minimal trapped interfacial charge, and device radiation hardness, 3. Polycrystalline and amorphous oxide semiconductors for printable transparent and mechanically flexible electronics, 4. Combining these materials sets to fabricate a thin-film transistor-based circuitries, 5. The relevance of these advances to unconventional photovoltaics.en_US
dc.format.extent68:32 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSTAMI-COPE Distinguished Lecture Seriesen_US
dc.subjectElectronic circuitryen_US
dc.subjectMaterials designen_US
dc.subjectOrganic semiconductorsen_US
dc.titleHow Do We Create and Process Materials for Flexible, Transparent Electronic Circuitry?en_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Center for the Science and Technology of Advanced Materials and Interfacesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Center for Organic Photonics and Electronicsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameNorthwestern University (Evanston, Ill.)en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record