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dc.contributor.authorRosu, Cornelia
dc.contributor.authorRusso, Paul S.
dc.contributor.authorReichmanis, Elsa
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-05T20:41:45Z
dc.date.available2018-06-05T20:41:45Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/59995
dc.descriptionPresented at the Symposium on Soft Matter Forefronts "Contributed Talks", April 20, 2018, from 11:10 a.m.-12:00 p.m. in the Student Center Ballroom, Georgia Tech.en_US
dc.descriptionChairs: Volodymyr Korolovych & Blair Brettmann (Georgia Tech).en_US
dc.descriptionCornelia Rosu is with the Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.en_US
dc.descriptionPaul S. Russo is with Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and School of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.descriptionElsa Reichmanis is with the Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and School of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 10:26 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractInteraction of biopolymers with organic electronic materials provides an appealing opportunity to design electroactive materials for use in many applications especially bioelectronics. Because of their biocompatibility, polypeptides do not act just as simple bio- components; rather they effectively influence the organization of π-conjugated polymers into highly crystalline structures that allow charge transport. The talk will focus on poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate), PBLG, a synthetic polypeptide that forms thermoreversible tree-dimensional networks. Blends with poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT, resulted in gel materials able to switch reversibly on and off their photo-physical properties. This behavior was observed during two cycles of heating-cooling-aging. Enhanced alignment of P3HT chains into J-aggregate structures, ideal for effective electronic performance, was attributed to interactions between the PBLG benzyl side chains and P3HT hexyl arms.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGeorgia Institute of Technology. College of Sciencesen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Materialsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGeorgia Institute of Technology. Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscienceen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineeringen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Physicsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAmerican Physical Societyen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipExxon Mobil Corporationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (U.S.)en_US
dc.format.extent10:26 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectBiopolymersen_US
dc.subjectGel materialsen_US
dc.subjectPoly(3-hexylthiophene)en_US
dc.subjectPoly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)en_US
dc.subjectPolypeptidesen_US
dc.subjectSoft matteren_US
dc.titleSoft, Responsive and Semiconducting Gelsen_US
dc.title.alternativePolypeptide Induced Organization of Semiconducting Polymers into Hybrid Electroactive Materials with Enhanced Photo Physical Propertiesen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Center for the Science and Technology of Advanced Materials and Interfacesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Chemistry and Biochemistryen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineeringen_US


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