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dc.contributor.authorRebok, George W.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-13T15:36:02Z
dc.date.available2018-06-13T15:36:02Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/60028
dc.descriptionPresented on May 2, 2018 at 3:30 p.m. in the Peachtree Room, Georgia Tech Student Center.en_US
dc.descriptionGeorge W. Rebok has a background in gerontology and cognitive aging, developmental psychology, prevention science, and public mental health, as well as postdoctoral training in cognitive neuropsychology, epidemiology, and biostatistics. His research skills include extensive knowledge of aging and developmental theory and research, clinical experimental trial design, quantitative analyses of longitudinal data, and an ability to work collaboratively with multidisciplinary teams and research centers.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 74:38 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractOlder adults are more likely to fear losing their cognitive abilities than their physical abilities. Fortunately, a growing body of research suggests that cognitive decline isn’t inevitable for most people as they age and may even be reversible through cognitive interventions. However, controversy and confusion still surround the effectiveness of cognitive training with older adults and its impact on everyday life function and psychological well-being. This talk will focus on what the current research says about the effectiveness of various cognitive interventions for optimizing everyday function in the older population. Particular attention will be paid to skill-based interventions that target single or multiple cognitive abilities that are known to show significant age-related decline. A major question to be explored is the degree to which cognitive training transfers to non-trained ability domains and daily life tasks. We will also explore the use of multimodal interventions that combine different intervention approaches such as skill-based cognitive training with intellectual engagement or stimulation approaches as a way of promoting greater transfer to daily life activities.en_US
dc.format.extent74:38 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSchool of Psychology Colloquium on Optimal Agingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOptimal Aging Colloquiumen_US
dc.subjectCognitive trainingen_US
dc.subjectEveryday functionen_US
dc.subjectOlder adultsen_US
dc.titleOptimizing Everyday Function in Older Adults: Translating the Evidenceen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameJohns Hopkins University. School of Public Healthen_US


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