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dc.contributor.authorUrmson, Christopher (Chris)
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-07T21:45:50Z
dc.date.available2018-12-07T21:45:50Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/60599
dc.descriptionPresented on November 7, 2018 from 3:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. in the Technology Square Research Building (TSRB) Auditorium, Georgia Tech.en_US
dc.descriptionThe Sixth Kelly Distinguished Lecturer.en_US
dc.descriptionChris Urmson is the co-founder and CEO of Aurora, the company building self-driving technology to deliver the benefits of the future of transportation safely, quickly, and broadly. Urmson has been instrumental in instigating and advancing the development of self-driving vehicles and the industry for the last 15 years. Before founding Aurora, he helped build Google’s self-driving car program where he served as CTO. Prior, Urmson was a faculty member of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University where he worked with house-size trucks, drove robots around in deserts, and was the technical director of the DARPA Urban and Grand Challenge teams. He earned his PhD in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University and his BSc in computer engineering from the University of Manitoba in 1998.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 62:41 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractWe are in a new era of mobility. Synergistic changes within the automotive industry are occurring simultaneously that have the potential to reduce important social costs: electric cars, ride sharing, and self-driving technology. The introduction of self-driving vehicles is the most technologically complex and the most far-reaching in its consequences; however, the question is no longer “Will we ever live in a world with self-driving vehicles?” but rather it’s “How quickly will they be here and what will our lives be like when they are?” Across the industry, what we endeavor to achieve is transcendent; we are developing a computing system to perform the task of transporting and keeping safe our most precious asset: human lives. Self-driving vehicles will make the roads safer, make mobility accessible to more people, and reduce congestion and pollution in cities, thus improving the quality of life for all. Aurora approaches the challenge of designing and building self-driving vehicles as an applied science problem, not as conventional product development. The fundamental technical challenges of bringing self-driving cars into the world are related to solving hard science problems. We must look at the world dynamically, as the complex and nuanced system of behaviors and objects that it is. As a result, Aurora is taking a clean start to building self-driving technology safely and quickly, for the public to benefit it from broadly.en_US
dc.format.extent62:41 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesKelly Distinguished Lecture on Robots and Jobsen_US
dc.subjectAutomotive industryen_US
dc.subjectComputing systemsen_US
dc.subjectSelf-driving technologyen_US
dc.titleDelivering the Benefits of Self-Driving Technology Safely, Quickly, and Broadlyen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machinesen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameAurora Innovationen_US


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