Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWeber, Rodney
dc.contributor.authorMin, Justin
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-08T12:47:52Z
dc.date.available2020-09-08T12:47:52Z
dc.date.created2020-08
dc.date.issued2020-07-21
dc.date.submittedAugust 2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/63662
dc.description.abstractFormic acid partitioning was investigated at two sites in the southeast U.S., Yorkville, GA and Jefferson Street (JST). Previous studies in the southeast have shown that observed formic acid partitioning to fine particles did not agree with predicted partitioning due to very low predicted fine particle pH. This thesis looks to understand the possible causes for this discrepancy. The abundances of nonvolatile cations (NVCs) observed in particulate matter (PM) lead to the investigation of NVC complexation with formic acid to possibly provide additional insight on formic acid partitioning. Bulk particle pH and particle liquid water content were estimated using the ISORROPIA II thermodynamic model. Formic acid partitioning and pH results showed that assuming PM1.0-2.5 was externally mixed from PM1.0 at JST improved the agreement between the measured and predicted formic acid partitioning. This was only for PM1.0-2.5 because the partitioning pH was closer to neutral. However, it could not resolve the disagreement with PM1.0, suggesting that there may be different chemical processes and sources of formic acid that may be contributing to the fine and coarse mode. Increasing particle water concentrations also affected predicted partitioning of formic acid but were not sufficient to agree with observed partitioning. Correlations also indicate that formic acid in the southeast may be associated with mineral dust and biomass burning, suggesting a need to understand the source contributions of formic acid in more detail.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technology
dc.subjectAerosols
dc.subjectAtmospheric aerosols
dc.subjectAerosol pH
dc.subjectThermodynamic model
dc.subjectISORROPIA
dc.titleUnderstanding the role of formic acid in fine and coarse particle mode
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeM.S.
dc.contributor.departmentEarth and Atmospheric Sciences
thesis.degree.levelMasters
dc.contributor.committeeMemberNg, Nga Lee
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHuey, Lewis
dc.date.updated2020-09-08T12:47:52Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record