Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLian, Xiaojun L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T17:11:01Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T17:11:01Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/63812
dc.descriptionPresented online October 27, 2020, 12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. at Nano@Tech Virtual Fall 2020.en_US
dc.descriptionHosted by: Graduates In Nanotechnology (GIN) Research Group at Georgia Tech.en_US
dc.descriptionDr. Lance Lian received his PhD in Chemical engineering from University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2012. During his PhD, Dr. Lian's “Cardiomyocyte Differentiation from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells” paper was awarded the best biomedical paper in PNAS and the Cozzarelli Prize of the National Academy of Sciences in 2012. Dr. Lian did his postdoc training at Harvard University and Karolinska Institute for stem cell research. After joining Penn State in 2015, Dr. Lian developed the world’s first pancreatic cell differentiation method from stem cells for treating diabetes with only small molecules, which makes this production much more cost-effective and efficient.en_US
dc.descriptionRuntime: 46:21 minutesen_US
dc.description.abstractHuman pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offer the potential to generate large numbers of functional cardiomyocytes from clonal and patient-specific cell sources. Here we show that temporal modulation of Wnt signaling is both essential and sufficient for efficient cardiac induction in hPSCs under defined, growth factor-free conditions. shRNA knockdown of β-catenin during the initial stage of hPSC differentiation fully blocked cardiomyocyte specification, whereas glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibition at this point enhanced cardiomyocyte generation. Furthermore, sequential treatment of hPSCs with glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors followed by inducible expression of β-catenin shRNA or chemical inhibitors of Wnt signaling produced a high yield of virtually (up to 98%) pure functional human cardiomyocytes from multiple hPSC lines. The robust ability to generate functional cardiomyocytes under defined, growth factor-free conditions solely by genetic or chemically mediated manipulation of a single developmental pathway should facilitate scalable production of cardiac cells suitable for research and regenerative applications.en_US
dc.format.extent46:21 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNano@Tech Lecture Seriesen_US
dc.subjectCardiac diseasesen_US
dc.subjectStem cellsen_US
dc.titleEngineering Human Stem Cells for Treating Cardiac Diseasesen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnologyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenamePennsylvania State University. Department of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenamePennsylvania State University. Department of Biologyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameHuck Institutes of the Life Sciencesen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record