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dc.contributor.authorArovas, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-22T19:51:54Z
dc.date.available2021-04-22T19:51:54Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/64456
dc.descriptionPresented online on April 12, 2021 at 3:00 p.m.en_US
dc.descriptionDaniel Arovas is a Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of California, San Diego. He is primarily interested in theories of strongly correlated quantum systems, particularly in low dimensions where quantum fluctuations can lead to interesting and exotic new states of matter.
dc.descriptionRuntime: 92:41 minutes
dc.description.abstractThe quantum theory of magnetism has provided many durable paradigms for quantum phases of matter, including intrinsically quantum disordered states, symmetry-protected topological phases, and quantum spin liquids. It also served as a birthing ground for many important developments in the theory of quantum phase transitions. In this lecture, I will review some of the history and highlights of this very rich field.en_US
dc.format.extent00:00 minutes
dc.format.extent92:41 minutes
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPhysics Colloquium;
dc.subjectQuantum magnetismen_US
dc.subjectQuantum phase transitionsen_US
dc.subjectSpin chainsen_US
dc.subjectSpin liquidsen_US
dc.subjectSymmetry protected topological orderen_US
dc.titleQuantum Magnetism from the Iron Age to Todayen_US
dc.typeLectureen_US
dc.typeVideoen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Physicsen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of California, San Diego. Dept. of Physicsen_US


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