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dc.contributor.authorClendenen, Ashley Rebekah
dc.contributor.authorAleksandrov, Aleksandr
dc.contributor.authorJones, Brant M.
dc.contributor.authorLoutzenhiser, Peter G.
dc.contributor.authorBritt, Daniel T.
dc.contributor.authorOrlando, Thomas M.
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-10T21:05:59Z
dc.date.available2022-01-10T21:05:59Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/65559
dc.descriptionData for the following manuscript: Ashley R. Clendenen, Aleksandr Aleksandrov, Brant M. Jones, Peter G. Loutzenhiser, Daniel T. Britt, Thomas M. Orlando, Temperature programmed desorption comparison of lunar regolith to lunar regolith simulants LMS-1 and LHS-1, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Volume 592, 2022, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117632.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle of the data file corresponds to the data represented n the respective figure in the manuscript.
dc.description.abstractWater and molecular hydrogen evolution from Apollo sample 14163 and lunar regolith simulants LMS-1 and LHS-1 were examined using Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) in ultra-high vacuum. LMS-1, LHS-1, and Apollo 14163 released water upon heating, whereas only the Apollo sample directly released measurable quantities of molecular hydrogen. The resulting H2O and H2 TPD curves were fit using a model which considers desorption at the vacuum grain interface, transport in the void space between grain-grain boundaries, molecule formation via recombination reactions and sub-surface diffusion. The model yielded a most probable H2O formation and desorption effective activation energy of ~150 kJ mol-1 for all samples. The probability distribution widths were ~100 - 400, ~100 - 350, and ~100 - 300 kJ mol-1 for LMS-1, LHS-1, and Apollo 14163, respectively. In addition to having the narrowest energy distribution width, the Apollo sample released the least amount to water (103 ppm) relative to LMS-1 (176 ppm) and LHS-1 (195 ppm). Since essentially no molecular hydrogen was observed from the simulants, the results indicate that LMS-1 and LHS-1 display water surface binding and transport interactions similar to actual regolith but not the desorption chemistry associated with the implanted hydrogen from the solar wind. Overall, these terrestrial surrogates are useful for understanding the surface and interface interactions of lunar regolith grains, which are largely dominated by the terminal hydroxyl sites under both solar wind bombardment and terrestrial preparation conditions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) under cooperative agreement numbers NNA17BF68A (REVEALS) and 80NSSC19M0214 (CLASS)en_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectWateren_US
dc.subjectHydrogenen_US
dc.subjectVolatilesen_US
dc.subjectSimulantsen_US
dc.subjectRecombinative desorptionen_US
dc.subjectLunar regolithen_US
dc.subjectTemperature programmed desorptionen_US
dc.titleTemperature Programmed Desorption Comparison of Lunar Regolith to Lunar Regolith Simulants LMS-1 and LHS-1 - Data Filesen_US
dc.typeDataseten_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute of Technology. School of Chemistry and Biochemistryen_US
dc.relation.issupplementtohttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117632


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