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dc.contributor.authorLawler, Elisabeth N.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-09-16T15:11:04Z
dc.date.available2005-09-16T15:11:04Z
dc.date.issued2005-07-19en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/7203
dc.description.abstractWhen timing a fluent sequence of either movement or speech, evidence suggests that people consider the amount of time available during the production of a first unit to prepare a second unit, evident in a reverse length effect for response onset of the sequence (e.g., Griffin, 2003; Ketelaars, Garry, and Franks, 1997). The current study investigated whether such considerations extend to sequences composed of both speech and movement units. Participants named an object and manually traced a course to produce a fluent sequence. Duration of the first production was manipulated. If preparation modulation operates over speech and movement units within the same sequence, sequence onset will be earlier when the first unit is short in production duration as opposed to long. In general, participants began sequences later when production of first unit did not exceed preparation time of the second unit. This finding provides support for preparation.en_US
dc.format.extent283055 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subjectPlanningen_US
dc.subjectSpeech
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectSequences
dc.titlePreparation Modulation in Timing of Speech-Movement Sequencesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.advisorCommittee Member: Daniel Spieler; Committee Member: Paul Corballis; Committee Member: Zenzi Griffinen_US


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