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dc.contributor.authorHackbart-Dean, Pam
dc.contributor.authorde Catanzaro, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2005-12-15T14:53:25Z
dc.date.available2005-12-15T14:53:25Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationArchival Issues: Journal of the Midwest Archives Conference 27/2 (2002): 125-136.en
dc.identifier.issn10674993
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/7423
dc.description.abstractThe work of every archives includes selecting, preserving, and making available materials of enduring research value for current and future research use. This effort is done in conjunction with creating processing priorities, identifying space for collections, and locating resources and staffing. Processing plays a crucial role in making collections available to researchers. However, the action of processing cannot take place in isolation. Acquiring collections of quality, planning priorities for processing, determining levels of arrangement and description, establishing standards and procedures for processing, and working with "living" (or continuously growing) collections are fundamentally important for any successful archival program. Ultimately, the planning and management of processing becomes the essential building block for any archives.en
dc.format.extent1542509 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen
dc.subjectArchivesen
dc.titleThe Strongest Link: The Management and Processing of Large Collectionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.publisher.originalMidwest Archives Conference


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