Now showing items 1-20 of 54

    • Research Horizons [Volume 12, Number 4, Winter 1995] 

      McLees, Lea; Toon, John (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1995)
      Engineering Georgia Tech's Future - Tending to the multi-dimensional fundamentals of a growing research university in a quickly evolving world poses an enjoyable challenge for Georgia Tech's new president, Dr. Wayne Clough.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 13, Number 1, Spring 1995] 

      Toon, John; McLees, Lea (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1996-04-18)
      Virtual Reality for Fear of Heights - An experimental therapy based on virtual reality (VR) computer simulations has helped persons with acrophobia reduce their fear of heights.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 13, Number 2, Summer/Fall 1995] 

      Kloeppel, James E.; McLees, Lea (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1996-05-08)
      Lessening the Earthquake Risk - Civil engineers, structural engineers, seismologists and city planners at Georgia Tech are pursuing programs in prediction, engineering, risk assessment and damage mitigation.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 13, Number 3, Winter 1996] 

      McLees, Lea (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1996-05-28)
      Research for the Games - Georgia Tech research is helping meet Atlanta's needs during the 1996 Summer Olympics and Paralympics.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 14, Number 1, Spring 1996] 

      O'Neil, Dara Veronica; Crowell, Amanda; Toon, John (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1996-09-12)
      Food Processing for Tomorrow - Research is helping enhance the competitiveness of Georgia's food processing industry
    • Research Horizons [Volume 14, Number 2, Summer/Fall 1996] 

      McLees, Lea; Hodges, Mark; Crowell, Amanda; Toon, John (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1996-11-27)
      Helping Printed Circuit Boards Take the Heat - A novel experimental technique for observing and recording PCB warpage is now available to the electronics industry.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 14, Number 3, Winter 1997] 

      McLees, Lea; Toon, John; Crowell, Amanda (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1997-05-30)
      The "Lifeblood" of Research - Graduate students are an indispensible part of scientific and technological exploration. (Story contains numerous graphics.)
    • Research Horizons [Volume 15, Number 1, Spring 1997] 

      Stone, Amy; McLees, Lea; Crowell, Amanda (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1997-07-31)
      Flying into the Future -- in Miniature - Tiny, nimble, self-piloted craft could collect or forward information for everyone from military officials to scientists, police and farmers.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 15, Number 2, Summer/Fall 1997] 

      Stone, Amy; Toon, John; Crowell, Amanda (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1997-12-03)
      Electrifying Transportation - Georgia Tech researchers are helping design the electric and electric-hybrid vehicles of tomorrow. They promise a cleaner future in transportation.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 15, Number 3, Winter 1998] 

      Stone, Amy; Robinson, Rick; McLees, Lea (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1998-04-07)
      Biotechnology - Research in bioscience and bioengineering is leading the way toward amazing medical breakthroughs in the next millenium.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 15, Number 4, Spring 1998] 

      Becker, T. J.; Goolrick, Faye; Meindl, James D. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1998-07-24)
      On-line Justice - Database provides bigger picture for court officials.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 16, Number 1, Summer/Fall 1998] 

      Toon, John; Sanders, Jane M.; Robinson, Rick; Bradley, John; Bates, Lincoln (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1998-10-07)
      Taking the Pain Out of Needles - Microneedles being developed by Georgia Tech offer a painless technique for delivering drugs. Thinner than a human hair, they could improve administration of existing medications and open ...
    • Research Horizons [Volume 16, Number 2, Winter 1999] 

      Stone, Amy; Becker, T. J.; Sanders, Jane M.; Powers, C. Blake; Robinson, Rick (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1999-01-14)
      Deciphering the Genetic Code - Georgia Tech researcher's computer program decodes more than 10 bacterial genomes.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 16, Number 3, Spring 1999] 

      Sanders, Jane M.; McLees, Lea; Toon, John; Bates, Lincoln (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1999-05-28)
      Sick Cities Diagnosis: Traffic Gridlock, Air Pollution and Urban Sprawl
    • Research Horizons [Volume 17, Number 1, Fall 1999] 

      Sanders, Jane M.; Goettling, Gary; Toon, John (Georgia Institute of Technology, 1999-10-26)
      Decades of Discovery and Design - Research Horizons recounts Georgia Tech research success stories.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 17, Number 2, Winter 2000] 

      Sanders, Jane M.; Goettling, Gary; Robinson, Rick; Becker, T. J.; Hainsworth, Amanda (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2000-02-15)
      Sensing the Subleties of Everyday Life - Aware Home with human-like perception could improve the quality of life for many, especially senior adults.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 17, Number 3, Spring 2000] 

      Toon, John; Sanders, Jane M.; Goettling, Gary; Becker, T. J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2000-05-22)
      Gorillas in the Bits - Remote sensing technology boosts efforts to protect engandered mountain gorillas and rebuild Rwanda's economy.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 18, Number 1, Fall 2000] 

      Sanders, Jane M.; Toon, John; Becker, T. J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2000-09-10)
      High-Tech Highway for Rural America - "Virtual corporation" delivers video and high-speed data over telephone wires of small, independent telephone companies.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 18, Number 2, Winter 2001] 

      Sanders, Jane M.; Toon, John (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2001-02-16)
      Bioinformatics - Georgia researchers are finding genes and breaking barriers with bioinformatics.
    • Research Horizons [Volume 18, Number 3, Spring/Summer 2001] 

      Toon, John; Sanders, Jane M. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2001-07-14)
      The Next Big Thing... Is Very Small