Now showing items 18-23 of 23

    • Not Lost in Space: Science and Technology as Women's Work in Postwar Science Fiction 

      Yaszek, Lisa (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2005-09-27)
      The new technologies that proliferated after World War II — including everything from atomic bombs and communication satellites to deep freezers and automatic coffee makers — radically transformed American thinking about ...
    • Older Adult Expertise in Emotion Regulation: Gains and Costs 

      Blanchard-Fields, Fredda (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2008-09-16)
      Despite research that shows cognitive decline as we grow older, changes in emotion show a positive developmental trajectory. This talk will address two questions. What are the skills older adults possess and use when ...
    • Self-organizing logistics systems 

      Bartholdi, John J., III (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2007-09-04)
      The social insects, such as bees or ants, operate complex logistics systems that are efficient even though no agent is in charge. Instead of a centralized control, each agent follows a simple local rule and an efficient ...
    • Sports Scheduling 

      Nemhauser, George L. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2005-10-25)
      College and professional sports, including basketball, baseball, football and hockey, is a multi-billion dollar industry with a substantial part of the revenue derived from television. To maximize revenue, it is crucial ...
    • Thinking Outside the Black Box: Getting People Excited about Science and Engineering 

      Ludovice, Peter J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2006-09-19)
      A number of societal factors are contributing to society's decreasing interest in science and technology, despite its ubiquitous presence in modern society. These factors include everything from the failure of scientists ...
    • Visionary or Autocrat: Pat Crecine and Georgia Tech Reorganization, 1988-1990 

      Giebelhaus, August (Georgia Institute of Technology, 2006-02-28)
      The adminstration of Georgia Tech's ninth president, John Patrick "Pat" Crecine, was the most controversial in the school's history. The period from 1987 to 1994 would become marked by much change and significant ...